Alice in Wonderland : development of Alice’s identity within adaptations

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Alice in Wonderland : development of Alice’s identity within adaptations

 

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Title: Alice in Wonderland : development of Alice’s identity within adaptations
Author: Johannessen, Finn-Henning
Date: 15-May-2011
Type: Master thesis; Mastergradsoppgave
Abstract: In this master thesis, I have analyzed the development of Alice’s identity in selected adaptations of Lewis Carroll’s (1832-1898) "Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland" (1865) and compared them to the original book. I chose three adaptations, Tim Burton’s "Alice in Wonderland" (2010), the videogame inspired by this movie (2010), and the videogame "American McGee’s Alice" (2000). I have applied discourse theory, established by Ernesto Laclau and Chantal Mouffe, to explore how the discourses, which Alice encounters on her side of the border and in Wonderland, shape her identity. Language, discursive articulations in the form of exposition, and bodily experience are agents in shaping Alice’s discourses. I have applied border theory to understand how crossing over to and from Wonderland can be seen as entering a new set of discourses. I concluded that all of the adaptations, which I have analyzed, maintain several important elements and scenes, which are presented in the book and are important for Alice’s developing identity. Depending on the type of medium, the adaptations implement technological tools, which are used in presenting this major theme. The focus on Alice’s identity is maintained. However, the adaptations provide a modern perspective, compared to Carroll’s books, which are based on Victorian ideals
Publisher: Universitetet i Tromsø; University of Tromsø
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10037/3541


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