Would loss to follow-up bias the outcome evaluation of patients operated for degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine?

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Would loss to follow-up bias the outcome evaluation of patients operated for degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine?

 

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Title: Would loss to follow-up bias the outcome evaluation of patients operated for degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine?
Author: Solberg, Tore; Sørlie, Andreas; Sjåvik, Kristin; Nygaard, Øystein Petter; Ingebrigtsen, Tor
Date: 2011
Type: Journal article; Tidsskriftartikkel; Peer reviewed
Abstract: Loss to follow-up may bias the outcome assessments of clinical registries. In this study, we wanted to determine whether outcomes were different in responding and non-responding patients who were included in a clinical spine surgery registry, at two years of follow-up. In addition, we wanted to identify risk factors for failure to respond. 633 patients who were operated for degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine were followed for 2 years using a local clinical spine registry. Those who did not attend the clinic and those who did not answer a postal questionnaire—for whom 2 years of outcome data were missing—and who would be lost to follow-up according to the standard procedures of the registry protocols, were defined as non-respondents. They were traced and interviewed by telephone. Outcome measures were: improvement in health-related quality of life (EQ-5D), leg pain, and back pain; and also general state of health, employment status, and perceived benefits of the operation. We found no statistically significant differences in outcome between respondents (78% of the patients) and nonrespondents (22%). Receipt of postal questionnaires (not being summoned for a follow-up visit) was the strongest risk factor for failure to respond. Forgetfulness appeared to be an important cause. Older patients and those who had complications were more likely to respond. Interpretation A loss to follow-up of 22% would not bias conclusions about overall treatment effects and, importantly, there were no indications of worse outcomes in non-respondents.
Description: This paper is part of Tore Solberg's doctoral thesis, available in Munin at http://hdl.handle.net/10037/5733
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Citation: Acta Orthopaedica 82(2011) nr. 1 s. 56-63
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10037/3955


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