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dc.contributor.advisorElvevoll, Edel O.
dc.contributor.authorMæhre, Hanne K
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-22T10:21:47Z
dc.date.available2016-04-22T10:21:47Z
dc.date.issued2016-03-11
dc.description.abstractAs a consequence of the expected population growth towards 2050, the demand for food, and in particular proteins, will increase. Due to limited resources of arable land and freshwater, this increase cannot come in the agricultural sector alone. At present, the utilization of marine environments for food production is low and should be increased. Seaweeds are fast-growing plants occurring in marine environments worldwide and some of them have proven to be rich in proteins. Living in oceans, they neither need arable land nor freshwater in order to grow and as primary producers they absorb inorganic compounds from their surroundings and convert them into macronutrients. The overall aims of this project were to examine the nutritional quality, along with effects of processing on bioaccessibility and extractability of seaweed proteins, and to evaluate their suitability as food, feed or ingredients in such. The specific goals were limited to i) document the nutritional composition in ten different seaweed species, ii) study the impact of heat treatment on the bioaccessibility of seaweed proteins, and iii) study the effect of enzymatic treatment on the bioaccessibility and extractability of seaweed proteins. The lipid contents in seaweeds were generally low, while mineral contents were high. The protein contents were generally higher in red seaweeds than in the other classes. However, the variation in protein contents within the brown and green seaweeds were large. The protein contents were generally lower than presented in many other studies, most likely due to methodological differences. However, also seasonal and geographical variations may have influenced this. The proteins in several of the analysed seaweeds were found to be complete proteins, as they contained sufficient amounts of the essential amino acids in order to cover the human requirements. Both protein content and quality of dulse (Palmaria palmata) were higher compared to that of wheat, corn and rice. In P. palmata, heat treatment increased the amount of accessible amino acids and the amount of amino acids liberated during a simulated gastrointestinal digestion model. The contents of essential amino acids were not negatively affected as a result of the process. For winged kelp (Alaria esculenta), no equivalent changes were observed. Also enzymatic treatment of P. palmata increased the amount of accessible amino acids and the amount of amino acids liberated during a simulated gastrointestinal digestion model. Enzymatic treatment also increased the protein extractability.en_US
dc.description.doctoraltypeph.d.en_US
dc.description.popularabstractØkt utnyttelse av marine ressurser til matproduksjon blir stadig viktigere. Målet for dette prosjektet har vært å undersøke næringsinnhold, samt effekter av prosessering på ulike tang- og tarearter. De analyserte algene hadde generelt lavt fettinnhold og høyt mineralinnhold. Rødalgen søl hadde høyt proteininnhold med høyt innhold av essensielle aminosyrer. Varmebehandling økte biotilgjengeligheten av proteinene i søl, men ikke i butare. Enzymatisk behandling økte biotilgjengeligheten og ekstraheringsutbyttet av proteinene i søl.en_US
dc.descriptionPaper II of this thesis is as published version not available in Munin, but available in <a href=http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10811-015-0587-4>Journal of Applied Phycology, April 2015.</a> The accepted manuscript version of paper II is available in Munin: <a href=http://hdl.handle.net/10037/8550> Heat treatment improves the protein bioaccessibility in the red seaweed dulse (Palmaria palmata), but not in the brown seaweed winged kelp (Alaria esculenta). Mæhre HK, Edvinsen GK, Eilertsen K-E & Elvevoll EO.</a><br>Paper III of this thesis is not available in Munin: Enzymatic pre-treatment increases the protein bioaccessibility and extractability in dulse (Palmaria palmata). Mæhre HK, Elvevoll EO & Eilertsen K-E. (Manuscript)en_US
dc.identifier.isbn978-82-8266-111-9
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10037/9130
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:no-uit_munin_8692
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherUiT The Arctic University of Norwayen_US
dc.publisherUiT Norges arktiske universiteten_US
dc.rights.accessRightsopenAccess
dc.subject.courseIDDOKTOR-002en_US
dc.subjectVDP::Agriculture and fishery disciplines: 900::Fisheries science: 920::Other fisheries disciplines: 929en_US
dc.subjectVDP::Landbruks- og Fiskerifag: 900::Fiskerifag: 920::Andre fiskerifag: 929en_US
dc.titleSeaweed proteins - how to get to them? Effects of processing on nutritional value, bioaccessibility and extractabilityen_US
dc.typeDoctoral thesisen_US
dc.typeDoktorgradsavhandlingen_US


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