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dc.contributor.authorSánchez-Hernández, Javier
dc.contributor.authorFinstad, Anders Gravbrøt
dc.contributor.authorArnekleiv, Jo Vegar
dc.contributor.authorKjærstad, Gaute
dc.contributor.authorAmundsen, Per-Arne
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-11T13:21:35Z
dc.date.available2019-03-11T13:21:35Z
dc.date.issued2018-09-24
dc.description.abstractWe analysed data of a globally distributed model organism (brown trout) in an attempt to understand relationships among biogeography, prey communities and climate on diet composition at regional spatial scales (Scandinavia), and thereafter explored whether diet patterns remained the same at global scales. At regional scales, we uncovered comprehensive patterns in diet composition among neighbouring freshwater ecoregions, with site-specific prey communities as the best predictor of the observed prey utilisation patterns. Thus, we posit that environmental gradients altering site-specific prey communities and consequently the trophic niche of the predator through bottom-up mechanisms are key in understanding spatial dietary patterns. Proximity was also important for the revealed biogeographic patterns at global scales. We suggest that geographic location (latitude and elevation) as a proxy of environmental heterogeneity is key at small spatial scales, and climate at global extents, to understand spatial dietary patterns. Our findings support the hypothesis that future shifts in prey communities due to climate change will strengthen biographical patterns in feeding of freshwater fishes, with consequences for invasiveness assessment and nature management and conservation.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipGalician Plan for Research, Innovation, and Growth (Plan I2C, Xunta de Galicia)en_US
dc.descriptionAccepted manuscript version. Source at <a href=https://doi.org/10.1139/cjfas-2018-0207>https://doi.org/10.1139/cjfas-2018-0207. </a>en_US
dc.identifier.citationSánchez-Hernández, J., Finstad, A.G., Arnekleiv, J.V., Kjærstad, G. &, Amundsen, P-A. (2018). Drivers of diet patterns in a globally distributed freshwater fish species. <i>Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences</i>. https://doi.org/10.1139/cjfas-2018-0207en_US
dc.identifier.issn0706-652X
dc.identifier.issn1205-7533
dc.identifier.otherFRIDAID 1680273
dc.identifier.otherhttps://doi.org/10.1139/cjfas-2018-0207
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10037/14936
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherNRC Research Pressen_US
dc.relation.journalCanadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
dc.rights.accessRightsopenAccessen_US
dc.subjectbiogeographic patternsen_US
dc.subjectclimate changeen_US
dc.subjectfreshwater ecoregionsen_US
dc.subjectglobal trophic ecologyen_US
dc.subjectmacroecologyen_US
dc.subjectmodellingen_US
dc.subjectVDP::Mathematics and natural science: 400::Zoology and botany: 480en_US
dc.subjectVDP::Matematikk og Naturvitenskap: 400::Zoologiske og botaniske fag: 480en_US
dc.titleDrivers of diet patterns in a globally distributed freshwater fish speciesen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.typeTidsskriftartikkelen_US
dc.typePeer revieweden_US


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