Fixed appliance & root resorption - possible to predict? : a literature review

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Fixed appliance & root resorption - possible to predict? : a literature review

 

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Title: Fixed appliance & root resorption - possible to predict? : a literature review
Author: Berglund, Iris Hergot; Beck-Hansen, Sesilie
Date: Jun-2012
Type: Master thesis; Mastergradsoppgave
Abstract: There are many possible causes to external apical root resorption (EARR) as a sequela of orthodontic treatment with fixed appliance. This literature review examines root morphology, age, commonly affected teeth, magnitude of force, continuous versus interrupted forces and duration of treatment, in order to evaluate if root resorption can be predicted. Qualitative analysis of a range of studies in this area has been made. All of the contributing factors above had a connection to root resorption of varying extents. It is therefore essential for a clinician to be aware of these factors, to be able to estimate the risk of root resorption individually for each patient.Abnormal root morphology may increase the risk of root resorption. This is specially valid for pipette-shaped roots. Maxillary incisors seem to be the teeth most likely to suffer from EARR. From the root resorption point of view orthodontic treatment should begin as early as possible since there is less risk of root resorption in young and developing teeth. Light orthodontic forces seem to present a smaller risk of resorption than heavy forces. If initial resorption is detected, a pause in treatment of two-three months should be considered. With sustained quality, treatment duration should always be as short as possible.
Publisher: Universitetet i Tromsø; University of Tromsø
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10037/4274


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