Now showing items 1-11 of 11

    • Birch (Betula, Betulacae) bark horns and similar instruments in Norway. 

      Alm, Torbjørn (Journal article; Tidsskriftartikkel; Peer reviewed, 2015-11-30)
      Wooden horns wrapped in coiled birch bark (Norwegian: lur) have a long history in Norway, dating back at least to the 7th century AD. By the Vikings, they were used for various signalling purposes, e.g. during battles. More recent uses are generally peaceful—to celebrate the opening of fairs, announce bishop visitations etc. In the 19th century, playing such instruments was as a popular past-time ...
    • Ergotism in Norway, part I: The symptoms and their interpretation from the late Iron Age to the seventeenth century. 

      Alm, Torbjørn; Elvevåg, Brita (Journal article; Tidsskriftartikkel; Peer reviewed, 2013)
      Ergotism is a horrendous disease with grotesque symptoms caused by ingesting specific ergot alkaloids. Mass poisoning episodes are attributable to consumption of grain – usually rye – infected with the fungus Claviceps purpurea. By focusing on possible cases of ergotism, we re-examine Norwegian history from the sagas through to the end of the seventeenth century. Our review – not intended to be ...
    • Ethnobotany of Heracleum persicum Desf. ex Fisch., an invasive species in Norway, or how plant names, uses, and other traditions evolve 

      Alm, Torbjørn (Journal article; Tidsskriftartikkel; Peer reviewed, 2013)
      Heracleum persicum was introduced to Norway as an ornamental in the 1830′s. Towards the end of the 19th century, it started spreading outside gardens, later to become a frequent sight in the major towns and settlements of North Norway – and a veritable pest plant. During the last 100 years or so, a substantial ethnobotanical tradition related to the species has evolved, demonstrating that folk ...
    • Fern rhizomes as fodder in Norway 

      Alm, Torbjørn (Journal article; Tidsskriftartikkel; Peer reviewed, 2016-09-06)
      Background: Although ferns are often known under collective names in Norway, e.g. blom, a substantial number of vernacular names for individual fern species are known, in particular for useful or poisonous taxa. In the past, the rhizomes (Norwegian: moldfôr) of selected species were collected for fodder. Only scattered records of such use are available from southern Norway, and the tradition’s ...
    • Giant invasive Heracleum persicum: Friend or foe of plant diversity? 

      Rijal, Dilli Prasad; Alm, Torbjørn; Nilsen, Lennart; Alsos, Inger Greve (Journal article; Tidsskriftartikkel; Peer reviewed, 2017-05-30)
      The impact of invasion on diversity varies widely and remains elusive. Despite the con- siderable attempts to understand mechanisms of biological invasion, it is largely un- known whether some communities’ characteristics promote biological invasion, or whether some inherent characteristics of invaders enable them to ...
    • Hvor godt er karplantefloraen i Norge kartlagt? 3. Nordland 

      Alm, Torbjørn; Pedersen, Oddvar (Journal article; Tidsskriftartikkel; Peer reviewed, 2017)
      Nordland is Norway’s second largest county, with an areal extent of 38,482 km 2 . In general, Nordland is reasonably well covered in terms of botanical exploration, with few blank areas. No flora covering the entire area has ever been compiled, but floristic surveys are available from several part areas, ranging in size from single localities to large districts. Still, the absence of a ...
    • Microsatellite markers for Heracleum persicum (Apiaceae) and allied taxa: application of next-generation sequencing to develop genetic resources for invasive species management 

      Rijal, Dilli Prasad; Falahati-Anbaran, Mohsen; Alm, Torbjørn; Alsos, Inger Greve (Journal article; Tidsskriftartikkel; Peer reviewed, 2014)
    • Pestplanten tromsøsvineblom Jacobaea alpina x subalpina i Norge - opphav og status 

      Alm, Torbjørn; Deschamps, Amandine Maria; Often, Anders (Journal article; Tidsskriftartikkel; Peer reviewed, 2016)
      Jacobaea alpina (syn. Senecio alpinus, S. cordatus ) and J. subalpina (syn. Senecio subalpinus ) are native to the mountains of Central Europe. Both were cultivated as ornamentals in late 19th century Tromsø. From the early 1990’s onwards, numerous Jacobaea stands have been noticed outside gardens, in particular at Tromsø, but extending from Lenvik in central Troms northwards ...
    • Plant species introduced by foreigners according to folk tradition in Norway and some other European countries: Xenophobic tales or not? 

      Alm, Torbjørn (Journal article; Tidsskriftartikkel; Peer reviewed, 2015-10-05)
      Background In their quest to understand and interpret nature, people have frequently sought religious or divine origins for plant species and their characteristics. Less often, historical events or persons are involved. This study comprises eleven cases of the latter kind, all claiming that plant species have been introduced by foreigners or at least from foreign lands. Methods Based on literature ...
    • Reconstructing the invasion history of Heracleum persicum (Apiaceae) into Europe 

      Rijal, Dilli Prasad; Alm, Torbjørn; Jahodová, Šárka; Stenøien, Hans K.; Alsos, Inger Greve (Journal article; Tidsskriftartikkel, 2015-11-06)
      Sparse, incomplete and inappropriate historical records of invasive species often hamper invasive species management interventions. Population genetic analyses of invaders might provide a suitable context for the identification of their source populations and possible introduction routes. Here, we describe the population genetics of Heracleum persicum Desf. ex Fisch and trace its route of introduction ...
    • Scented grasses in Norway - Identity and uses 

      Alm, Torbjørn (Journal article; Tidsskriftartikkel; Peer reviewed, 2015-12-23)
      Background: Some grass species are richer in coumarin and thus more sweetly scented than others. These have been eagerly sought after in parts of Norway, but the tradition has been weakly documented, both in terms of the species collected, their vernacular names, and uses. <p>Methods: Based on literature data and a substantial body of information collected during my own ethnobotanical field work, ...