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dc.contributor.authorGünther, Torsten
dc.contributor.authorMalmström, Helena
dc.contributor.authorSvensson, Emma M.
dc.contributor.authorOmrak, Ayça
dc.contributor.authorSánchez-Quinto, Frederico
dc.contributor.authorKılınç, Gülşah M.
dc.contributor.authorKrzewinska, Maja
dc.contributor.authorEriksson, Gunilla
dc.contributor.authorFraser, Magdalena
dc.contributor.authorEdlund, Hanna
dc.contributor.authorMunteres, Arielle R.
dc.contributor.authorCoutinho, Alexandra
dc.contributor.authorSimões, Luciana G.
dc.contributor.authorVicente, Mário
dc.contributor.authorSjölander, Anders
dc.contributor.authorSellevold, Berit J.
dc.contributor.authorJørgensen, Roger
dc.contributor.authorClaes, Peter
dc.contributor.authorShriver, Mark D.
dc.contributor.authorValdiosera, Cristina
dc.contributor.authorNetea, Mihai G.
dc.contributor.authorApel, Jan
dc.contributor.authorLidén, Kerstin Birgitta
dc.contributor.authorSkar, Birgitte
dc.contributor.authorStorå, Jan
dc.contributor.authorGötherström, Anders
dc.contributor.authorJakobsson, Mattias
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-07T09:01:19Z
dc.date.available2018-09-07T09:01:19Z
dc.date.issued2018-01-09
dc.description.abstractScandinavia was one of the last geographic areas in Europe to become habitable for humans after the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). However, the routes and genetic composition of these postglacial migrants remain unclear. We sequenced the genomes, up to 57× coverage, of seven hunter-gatherers excavated across Scandinavia and dated from 9,500–6,000 years before present (BP). Surprisingly, among the Scandinavian Mesolithic individuals, the genetic data display an east–west genetic gradient that opposes the pattern seen in other parts of Mesolithic Europe. Our results suggest two different early postglacial migrations into Scandinavia: initially from the south, and later, from the northeast. The latter followed the ice-free Norwegian north Atlantic coast, along which novel and advanced pressure-blade stone-tool techniques may have spread. These two groups met and mixed in Scandinavia, creating a genetically diverse population, which shows patterns of genetic adaptation to high latitude environments. These potential adaptations include high frequencies of low pigmentation variants and a gene region associated with physical performance, which shows strong continuity into modern-day northern Europeans.en_US
dc.description.abstract<i>Author summary</i>: The Scandinavian peninsula was the last part of Europe to be colonized after the Last Glacial Maximum. The migration routes, cultural networks, and the genetic makeup of the first Scandinavians remain elusive and several hypotheses exist based on archaeology, climate modeling, and genetics. By analyzing the genomes of early Scandinavian hunter-gatherers, we show that their migrations followed two routes: one from the south and another from the northeast along the ice-free Norwegian Atlantic coast. These groups met and mixed in Scandinavia, creating a population more diverse than contemporaneous central and western European hunter-gatherers. As northern Europe is associated with cold and low light conditions, we investigated genomic patterns of adaptation to these conditions and genes known to be involved in skin pigmentation. We demonstrate that Mesolithic Scandinavians had higher levels of light pigmentation variants compared to the respective source populations of the migrations, suggesting adaptation to low light levels and a surprising signal of genetic continuity in TMEM131, a gene that may be involved in long-term adaptation to the cold.en_US
dc.descriptionThis is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Günther, T., Malmström, H., Svensson, E.M., Omrak, A., Sánchez-Quinto, F., Kılınç, G., ... Jakobsson, M. (2018). Population genomics of Mesolithic Scandinavia: Investigating early postglacial migration routes and high-latitude adaptation. <i>PLoS biology</i>, 16(1). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.2003703. Source at <a href=https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.2003703> https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.2003703</a>.en_US
dc.identifier.citationGünther, T., Malmström, H., Svensson, E.M., Omrak, A., Sánchez-Quinto, F., Kılınç, G., ... Jakobsson, M. (2018). Population genomics of Mesolithic Scandinavia: Investigating early postglacial migration routes and high-latitude adaptation. PLoS biology, 16(1). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.2003703en_US
dc.identifier.issn1544-9173
dc.identifier.issn1545-7885
dc.identifier.otherFRIDAID 1541488
dc.identifier.other10.1371/journal.pbio.2003703
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10037/13706
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen_US
dc.relation.journalPLoS biology
dc.rights.accessRightsopenAccessen_US
dc.subjectVDP::Humaniora: 000::Arkeologi: 090::Nordisk arkeologi: 091en_US
dc.subjectVDP::Humanities: 000::Archeology: 090::Nordic archeology: 091en_US
dc.subjectMesolithic perioden_US
dc.subjectPaleogeneticsen_US
dc.subjectEuropeen_US
dc.subjectPopulation geneticsen_US
dc.subjectEffective population sizeen_US
dc.subjectArchaeologyen_US
dc.subjectGenomic librariesen_US
dc.subjectNorwegian peopleen_US
dc.titlePopulation genomics of Mesolithic Scandinavia: Investigating early postglacial migration routes and high-latitude adaptationen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.typeTidsskriftartikkelen_US
dc.typePeer revieweden_US


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