Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorTaipale, Sami Johan
dc.contributor.authorKahilainen, Kimmo Kalevi
dc.contributor.authorHoltgrieve, Gordon William
dc.contributor.authorPeltomaa, Elina Talvikki
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-02T12:04:11Z
dc.date.available2018-11-02T12:04:11Z
dc.date.issued2018-02-06
dc.description.abstractThe first few months of life is the most vulnerable period for fish and their optimal hatching time with zooplankton prey is favored by natural selection. Traditionally, however, prey abundance (i.e., zooplankton density) has been considered important, whereas prey nutritional composition has been largely neglected in natural settings. High‐quality zooplankton, rich in both essential amino acids (EAAs) and fatty acids (FAs), are required as starting prey to initiate development and fast juvenile growth. Prey quality is dependent on environmental conditions, and, for example, eutrophication and browning are two major factors defining primary producer community structures that will directly determine the nutritional quality of the basal food sources (algae, bacteria, terrestrial matter) for zooplankton. We experimentally tested how eutrophication and browning affect the growth and survival of juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by changing the quality of basal resources. We fed the fish on herbivorous zooplankton (Daphnia) grown with foods of different nutritional quality (algae, bacteria, terrestrial matter), and used GC‐MS, stable isotope labeling as well as bulk and compound‐specific stable isotope analyses for detecting the effects of different diets on the nutritional status of fish. The content of EAAs and omega‐3 (ω‐3) polyunsaturated FAs (PUFAs) in basal foods and zooplankton decreased in both eutrophication and browning treatments. The decrease in ω‐3 PUFA and especially docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) was reflected to fish juveniles, but they were able to compensate for low availability of EAAs in their food. Therefore, the reduced growth and survival of the juvenile fish was linked to the low availability of DHA. Fish showed very low ability to convert alpha‐linolenic acid (ALA) to DHA. We conclude that eutrophication and browning decrease the availability of the originally phytoplankton‐derived DHA for zooplankton and juvenile fish, suggesting bottom‐up regulation of food web quality.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipAcademy of Finlanden_US
dc.descriptionSource at <a href=https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.3832> https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.3832</a>.en_US
dc.identifier.citationTaipale, S.J., Kahilainen, K.K., Holtgrieve, G.W. & Peltomaa, E.T. (2018). Simulated eutrophication and browning alters zooplankton nutritional quality and determines juvenile fish growth and survival . Ecology and Evolution, 8(5), 2671-2687. https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.3832en_US
dc.identifier.issn2045-7758
dc.identifier.otherFRIDAID 1588758
dc.identifier.other10.1002/ece3.3832
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10037/14084
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherWiley Open Accessen_US
dc.relation.journalEcology and Evolution
dc.rights.accessRightsopenAccessen_US
dc.subjectVDP::Agriculture and fishery disciplines: 900::Fisheries science: 920en_US
dc.subjectVDP::Landbruks- og Fiskerifag: 900::Fiskerifag: 920en_US
dc.subjectamino acidsen_US
dc.subjectcompound‐specific stable isotopesen_US
dc.subjectessential biomoleculesen_US
dc.subjectfatty acidsen_US
dc.subjectfood weben_US
dc.subjectnutritional qualityen_US
dc.titleSimulated eutrophication and browning alters zooplankton nutritional quality and determines juvenile fish growth and survivalen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.typeTidsskriftartikkelen_US
dc.typePeer revieweden_US


File(s) in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following collection(s)

Show simple item record