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dc.contributor.advisorRamstad, Jorun Bræck
dc.contributor.authorFors, Bjarge Schwenke
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-07T11:52:19Z
dc.date.available2019-02-07T11:52:19Z
dc.date.issued2019-02-25
dc.description.abstractThis thesis deals with political, artistic and touristic performances on Norway’s border with Russia. Based on ethnographic research in and around the town of Kirkenes, the thesis demonstrates how the state border and the borderland are staged through these performances. On a more general level, it aims to identify, explore and increase our knowledge about the role of performances in the construction of state borders and borderlands. Adhering to Richard Schechner’s (2013) perspective on performances as being meaning-making practices, the border and the borderland are investigated as material phenomena as well as communicative social constructions. Similar to other border regions, the Norwegian-Russian borderland is marked by an intensive production of performances by local, national and international actors for local, national and international audiences. Throughout this thesis, these manifold border performances are analyzed within and across three fields: politics, art and tourism. It is argued that the border tends to be construed either as a bridge, marked by openness, connectedness, unity, and continuity, or as a barrier, marked by division, disunity, and discontinuity. Correspondingly, the borderland is also invested with meaning, morphed into a place of great significance – both as a unique transnational space, and as the dramatic interface between East and West.en_US
dc.description.doctoraltypeph.d.en_US
dc.description.popularabstractThis thesis explores performances on the border between Norway and Russia. Performance here denotes a wide range of actions and activities, from concerts and political speeches to guided tours and the raising of monuments. All these performances have one thing in common: They invest the border and the borderland with various meanings that so to speak “make” the border and borderland. Based on ethnographic research in and around the border town of Kirkenes, the thesis examines this meaning-making as it takes place within and across three fields: politics, art and tourism. It is argued that the border tends to be construed either as a bridge, marked by openness, unity, and continuity, or as a barrier, marked by division, disunity, and discontinuity. Correspondingly, the borderland is also invested with meaning, morphed into a place of great significance: A unique transnational space and a dramatic interface between East and West.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10037/14645
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherUiT Norges arktiske universiteten_US
dc.publisherUiT The Arctic University of Norwayen_US
dc.rights.accessRightsopenAccessen_US
dc.subject.courseIDDOKTOR-001
dc.subjectVDP::Samfunnsvitenskap: 200::Sosialantropologi: 250en_US
dc.subjectVDP::Social science: 200::Social anthropology: 250en_US
dc.titleBorder Performances: Politics, art and tourism where Norway meets Russiaen_US
dc.typeDoctoral thesisen_US
dc.typeDoktorgradsavhandlingen_US


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