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dc.contributor.advisorMyklebost, Kari Aga
dc.contributor.authorAfanasyeva, Anna
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-29T10:10:55Z
dc.date.available2019-03-29T10:10:55Z
dc.date.embargoEndDate2024-05-03
dc.date.issued2019-05-03
dc.description.abstractThis monograph examines boarding school policies introduced on the Sami people in the Soviet Union from 1935 to 1989. On the basis of field and archival research on the Kola Peninsula and in Moscow, conducted over the course of 2014 and 2015, the study offers historical accounts and experiences of residential schooling among three generations of the Sami people in Russia. Through Sami oral accounts, archival documents, as well as Soviet, Russian and Western sources, the dissertation explores a series of rapid policy changeovers in the boarding school education of the Sami. By focusing on two surpassing but contradictory tendencies in boarding school education of the Sami, the study cultivates notion of residential schooling as a tool for coeval empowerment and assimilation of indigenous peoples and their languages. The study finds that long-term separation of children and parents in result of residential education caused severe disintegration of an indigenous family as social arena for cultural and language transference across three studied generations.en_US
dc.description.doctoraltypeph.d.en_US
dc.description.popularabstract<p>If at one time researchers tended to romanticize indigenous communities, placing them outside of history, contemporary research is now becoming focused on the historical and social influences of particular relationships. This project analyzes the implementation and the consequences of boarding school policies introduced on the Kola Sami people in the Northwest Russia in the Soviet period from the 1935 up to 1989. <p>The study scrutinizes the mentioned processes from the point of view of its historical evolution, using an interdisciplinary approach in relation to the existing knowledge on the topic. Through Sami oral accounts, archival documents, as well as Soviet, Russian and Western sources, the dissertation explores a series of rapid policy changeovers in the boarding school education of the Sami. The similar policies have been introduced in other indigenous communities and contexts, though in different states, time periods and geographical areas. <p>The dissertation synthesizes systematic historical knowledge with an emphasis on socio-cultural information, contributing to a better understanding of the policies of assimilation in education of the Kola Sami and can be of a value for a range of specialists devoting their studies to indigenous peoples of the Arctic and Circumpolar North.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipI want to express my sincere gratitude for the funding provided by the Research Council of Norway. This doctoral dissertation was the result of a three-year personal doctoral grant, which I was generously awarded under the Program for Sami Research (2014–2017). I deeply appreciate the privilege of being able to take part and contribute to this research program.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10037/15101
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherUiT Norges arktiske universiteten_US
dc.publisherUiT The Arctic University of Norwayen_US
dc.relation.projectIDinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/RCN/P-SAMISK/234298/Norway/Assimilation policies in the education of the Kola Sámi in 1900s- 2010s: Historical development and consequences//en_US
dc.rights.accessRightsembargoedAccessen_US
dc.subject.courseIDDOKTOR-001
dc.subjectVDP::Humanities: 000::History: 070::Cultural history: 075en_US
dc.subjectVDP::Humaniora: 000::Historie: 070::Kulturhistorie: 075en_US
dc.titleBoarding School Education of the Sami People in Soviet Union (1935–1989): Experiences of Three Generations.en_US
dc.typeDoctoral thesisen_US
dc.typeDoktorgradsavhandlingen_US


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