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dc.contributor.advisorBjørn Ola, Tafjord
dc.contributor.authorNikanorova, Liudmila
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-20T06:30:04Z
dc.date.available2019-08-20T06:30:04Z
dc.date.issued2019-09-09
dc.description.abstractEach summer in the Sakha Republic (Russia), hundreds of thousands of people celebrate an event called yhyakh. This dissertation explores articulations, performances, and translations of the concepts ‘religion’ and ‘indigeneity’ at and around contemporary yhyakhs. It focuses particularly on how yhyakh is understood and performed by its participants, on the motivations of the actors who promote different yhyakhs, and on a wide variety of circulating narratives. The study is ethnographic in method and based on fieldwork at and around the Tuymaada Yhyakh and the Olongkho Yhyakh from 2016 to 2018. Using articulation theory and heuristic models of religion-making and indigenous-making, the analysis unpacks how ‘religion’ and ‘indigeneity’ appear as descriptors, aspects, and parts of yhyakh. Yhyakh has attracted scholarly interest since the 17th century. This attention has only increased after the dissolution of the Soviet Union, as the celebration of yhyakh has expanded rapidly and become a major rallying point of the Sakha revitalization movements. In both historical and contemporary contexts, scholars have categorized yhyakh as, for example, a ‘shamanic ceremony’, a ‘religious ritual’, the ‘Sakha national day’, an ‘indigenous festival’. My ethnographic material reveals much broader variety of understandings of yhyakh, including ‘healing’, a ‘family holiday’, and a ‘day when Sakha feel Sakha’. By exploring how yhyakh and its practices are translated <i>towards</i> and <i>away from</i> ‘religion’ and ‘indigeneity’, not only by scholars but also by a wide range of other actors, I show how categorizing are powerful acts with far-reaching effects both for those who categorize and for that which is categorized.en_US
dc.description.doctoraltypeph.d.en_US
dc.description.popularabstractEach summer in the Sakha Republic (Russia), hundreds of thousands of people celebrate an event called yhyakh. This dissertation explores articulations, performances and translations of the concepts ‘religion’ and ‘indigeneity’ at and around contemporary yhyakhs. It focuses on how yhyakh is understood and performed by its participants, on the motivations of the actors who promote yhyakhs, and on a variety of circulating narratives. The study is ethnographic in method and based on fieldwork at and around the Tuymaada Yhyakh and the Olongkho Yhyakh from 2016 to 2018. Scholars have categorized yhyakh as, for example, a ‘shamanic ceremony’, a ‘religious ritual’, an ‘indigenous festival’. My ethnographic material reveals much broader variety of understandings of yhyakh. By exploring how yhyakh and its practices are translated towards and away from ‘religion’ and ‘indigeneity’, by scholars and a wide range of other actors, I show how categorizing are powerful acts with far-reaching effects.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe Research Council of Norwayen_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10037/15960
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherUiT Norges arktiske universiteten_US
dc.publisherUiT The Arctic University of Norwayen_US
dc.rights.accessRightsopenAccessen_US
dc.subject.courseIDDOKTOR-001
dc.subjectyhyakhen_US
dc.subjectSakha peopleen_US
dc.subjectreligionen_US
dc.subjectindigeneityen_US
dc.subjectarticulationsen_US
dc.subjecttranslationsen_US
dc.subjectperformancesen_US
dc.titleReligion and Indigeneity at Yhyakhen_US
dc.typeDoctoral thesisen_US
dc.typeDoktorgradsavhandlingen_US


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