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dc.contributor.advisorLund, Niels Windfeld
dc.contributor.authorBarlindhaug, Gaute
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-06T07:42:01Z
dc.date.available2019-09-06T07:42:01Z
dc.date.issued2019-09-13
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation seeks to discuss how new tools for mediating sounds have developed and changed our aesthetic evaluation and framing of musical sounds. The possibility to create and reproduce sounds has had a great impact on the aesthetic development of music and is a topic that can be approached from many angles. This dissertation focuses on three different technological tools that have been important in shaping music from the 1980s onwards. The first examples discussed are the use of Roland´s early drum machines, the TR-808 and TR-909. Here, the focus is on the synthesised kick drum sound and how it enabled the production of base heavy club music. The second example discusses the praxis of sampling as it developed from the samplers in the early 1980s to present day DAW software. The focus is on how different ways of defining the status and cultural purpose of sound recording facilitated different aesthetic approaches to using such recordings in an artistic creative process. The third example analyses cases where artists themselves use digital and electronic tools to create new sound producing devices; not so much to develop and commodify new instruments, but as a focal point in the actual artistic expression. In all three of the examples discussed, the focus is on how novel possibilities in mediating sounds become part of a renegotiation of existing aesthetic ideals in music. It is not so much the novelty of the different tools themselves that are important, but how the new possibilities these tools enable become interpreted as strengthening or diverging from established aesthetic concepts of music.en_US
dc.description.doctoraltypeph.d.en_US
dc.description.popularabstractThis dissertation focusses on how the development of new sound technology influences our understanding of what sounds are to be regarded as musical. In our society there has always existed a division between what sounds are considered to be appreciated as part of music and what is considered to be just noise. Historically, traditional instruments have been seen as the main source for such musical sounds. With the introduction of technology that could create sound independently of traditional acoustic methods, artists suddenly had a new possibility to explore sounds beyond the traditional musical framework. What I discuss in this dissertation is how these artistic possibilities manage not only create new sounds, but most importantly to make us reevaluate our cultural expectation of how both music should sound and how it is to be created.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10037/16097
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherUiT Norges arktiske universiteten_US
dc.publisherUiT The Arctic University of Norwayen_US
dc.rights.accessRightsopenAccessen_US
dc.subject.courseIDDOKTOR-001
dc.subjectVDP::Humanities: 000::Musicology: 110en_US
dc.subjectVDP::Humaniora: 000::Musikkvitenskap: 110en_US
dc.subjectVDP::Humanities: 000::History of art: 120::Modern history of the arts: 129en_US
dc.subjectVDP::Humaniora: 000::Kunsthistorie: 120::Moderne kunsthistorie: 129en_US
dc.titleThe Kids Want Noise - How Sonic Mediations Change the Aesthetics of Musicen_US
dc.typeDoctoral thesisen_US
dc.typeDoktorgradsavhandlingen_US


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