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dc.contributor.authorPiira, Anu Mirjam
dc.contributor.authorLannem, Anne M.
dc.contributor.authorSørensen, Marit
dc.contributor.authorGlott, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorKnutsen, Raymond
dc.contributor.authorJørgensen, Lone
dc.contributor.authorGjesdal, Knut
dc.contributor.authorHjeltnes, Nils
dc.contributor.authorKnutsen, Synnøve Fønnebø
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-07T20:30:11Z
dc.date.available2019-10-07T20:30:11Z
dc.date.issued2018-11-28
dc.description.abstract<p><i>Objective - </i>To assess the effects of manually assisted body-weight supported locomotor training in subjects with chronic incomplete spinal cord injury. <p><i>Design - </i>Randomized controlled clinical trial. <p><i>Subjects - </i>Twenty subjects with American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale grades C or D and > 2 years post-injury. <p><i>Methods - </i>Random allocation to 60 days of body-weight supported locomotor training, or usual care, which might include over-ground walking. Walking function, lower extremity muscle strength and balance were blindly evaluated pre-/post-intervention. <p><i>Results - </i>A small, non-significant improvement in walking function was observed (0.1 m/s (95% confidence interval (95% CI) –0.2, 0.4)), but subjects without baseline gait function, did not re-establish walking. The effect on lower extremity muscle strength was 2.7 points (95% CI –1.4, 6.8). No difference was observed in balance measures. <p><i>Conclusion - </i>Subjects with chronic incomplete spinal cord injury without baseline walking function were unable to re-establish gait with manually assisted body-weight supported locomotor training. A modest, non-significant, improvement was found in strength and walking speed. However, due to study recruitment problems, an effect size that was smaller than anticipated, and large functional heterogeneity among study subjects, the effect of late-onset body-weight supported locomotor training is not clear. Future studies should include larger numbers of subjects with less functional loss and greater functional homogeneity. Intensive training should probably start earlier post-injury.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNorwegian Health Authorities Norwegian Health and Rehabilitation Fundsen_US
dc.descriptionSource at <a href=https://doi.org/10.2340/16501977-2508>https://doi.org/10.2340/16501977-2508</a>.en_US
dc.identifier.citationPiira, A., Lannem, A.M., Sørensen, M., Glott, T., Knutsen, R., Jørgensen, L., ... Knutsen, S.F. (2019). Manually assisted body-weight supported locomotor training does not re-establish walking in non-walking subjects with chronic incomplete spinal cord injury: A randomized clinical trial. <i>Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, 51</i>, 113-119. https://doi.org/10.2340/16501977-2508en_US
dc.identifier.cristinIDFRIDAID 1704366
dc.identifier.doi10.2340/16501977-2508
dc.identifier.issn1650-1977
dc.identifier.issn1651-2081
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10037/16352
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherFoundation of Rehabilitation Informationen_US
dc.relation.journalJournal of Rehabilitation Medicine
dc.rights.accessRightsopenAccessen_US
dc.subjectVDP::Medical disciplines: 700::Clinical medical disciplines: 750::Physical medicine and rehabilitation: 764en_US
dc.subjectVDP::Medisinske Fag: 700::Klinisk medisinske fag: 750::Fysikalsk medisin og rehabilitering: 764en_US
dc.subjectspinal cord injuryen_US
dc.subjectlocomotor trainingen_US
dc.subjectbody-weight supporten_US
dc.subjecttreadmillen_US
dc.titleManually assisted body-weight supported locomotor training does not re-establish walking in non-walking subjects with chronic incomplete spinal cord injury: A randomized clinical trialen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.typeTidsskriftartikkelen_US
dc.typePeer revieweden_US


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