Vis enkel innførsel

dc.contributor.advisorBrennen, Tim
dc.contributor.advisorHolte, Arne
dc.contributor.authorWang, Catharina Elisabeth
dc.date.accessioned2007-03-05T13:21:14Z
dc.date.available2007-03-05T13:21:14Z
dc.date.issued2006-10-13
dc.description.abstractThe overall aim of the present study was to investigate how cognitive processing of emotionally valenced information may be a vulnerability factor to depression, and to develop a cognitive model of recurrent depression. Several more specific aims were formulated and investigated. To reach the aims of the study, an extensive theoretical review of the research literature on cognitive processes of depression was carried out. Also, we compared never depressed (ND; n = 46), previously depressed (PD; n = 42) and clinically depressed (CD; n = 61) individuals on several questionnaires and experimental tasks including dysphoric symptoms (BDI; Beck et al., 1979), dysfunctional attitudes (DAS; Weissman & Beck, 1978), preferences for positive and negative tape-recorded self-statements (Crowson & Cromwell, 1995), choice preference and reaction time to emotionally valenced words (DOAT; Gotlib, McLachlan, & Katz, 1988; Kakolewski, Crowson, Sewell, & Cromwell, 1999; McCabe & Gotlib, 1995), and free recall, recognition and fabrication of positive and negative self-statements (Wang & Holte, 1995). The main results of the study was: (1) the development of a Cognitive battle model to explain mechanisms involved in recurrent depression; (2) results which seem to indicate that dysfunctional attitudes, in mildly to moderately clinically depressed individuals, may have the potential to decrease the effortful processing of positive stimuli; and, (3) results which indicate that decreased approach motivation to positive stimuli may be a vulnerability factor to depression. Future research should be aimed to examine the relationship between parenting (e.g. insecure attachment; inadequate affect regulation), frontal lobe development (i.e., hemispheric asymmetry), cognitive vulnerability factors (e.g. uncertainty; rumination), and decreased approach motivation to positive stimuli.en
dc.format.extent222433 bytes
dc.format.extent342495 bytes
dc.format.extent222397 bytes
dc.format.extent418272 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.identifier.isbn89-91636-30-3
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10037/660
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:no-uit_munin_422
dc.language.isoengen
dc.publisherUniversitetet i Tromsøen
dc.publisherUniversity of Tromsøen
dc.rights.accessRightsopenAccess
dc.subjectVDP::Samfunnsvitenskap: 200::Psykologi: 260::Klinisk psykologi: 262en
dc.subjectattentional biasen
dc.subjectfabricationen
dc.subjectrecognitionen
dc.subjectpreventionen
dc.subjectdysfunctional attitudesen
dc.subjectvulnerabilityen
dc.subjectrecurrenceen
dc.subjectdepressionen
dc.subjectcopingen
dc.subjectschemasen
dc.subjectcognitionen
dc.subjectavoidanceen
dc.subjectapproach motivationen
dc.subjectrecallen
dc.titleDepression and cognitive vulnerabilityen
dc.typeDoctoral thesisen
dc.typeDoktorgradsavhandlingen


Tilhørende fil(er)

Denne innførselen finnes i følgende samling(er)

Vis enkel innførsel