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dc.contributor.advisorGerd, Bjørhovde
dc.contributor.authorMikalsen, Paula Ryggvik
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-25T10:35:13Z
dc.date.available2015-08-25T10:35:13Z
dc.date.issued2015-05-29
dc.description.abstractMargaret Atwood and Angela Carter are but two of many authors who have appropriated the fairy tale genre and used its plethora of tales as intertext and playground for their artistic vision. This thesis will look selected stories from The Bloody Chamber (1979), Bluebeard’s Egg (1983) and Good Bones (1992). These collections engage with the fairy-tale canon, in both form, content and intertext, and underlines the efficacy of using fairy tales to offer critique of patriarchal mechanisms and harmful practices. This thesis will examine seven short stories from these collections by using postructuralist and feminist theory to analyse the process. The focus will be on whether it is possible to revision fairy tales using the traditional elements and topoi of the genre and still create narratives that can satisfy feminist values, without simply reversing the gender roles, i.e. the recipe for a “fractured fairy tale. Moreover, the thesis will give an account of the fairy-tale genre, the folktale, the fantasy genre and the Gothic fairy tale, to adumbrate the traits and elements that Carter and Atwood employ. The main theoretical framework will consist of using theories by postructuralist feminist theorists like Hélène Cixous, Julia Kristeva and Luce Irigaray, and postructuralist Jacques Derrida. By giving an account of their theories on deconstruction of language, l’ectriture feminine, jouissance, and meaning-making, this thesis will the framework to examine whether Carter and Atwood manages to rewrite fairy tales implemented with feminist values, without adopting the style of male writers. Furthermore, reception theory will be used to explain the popularity and tenacity of the fairy-tale genre, exemplified by contemporary Disney movies and the genre of fan fiction. Finally, reception theory will demonstrate the obstacles the fairy tale genre’s popularity presents for feminist revision.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10037/7965
dc.identifier.urnURN:NBN:no-uit_munin_7558
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherUiT Norges arktiske universiteten_US
dc.publisherUiT The Arctic University of Norwayen_US
dc.rights.accessRightsopenAccess
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2015 The Author(s)
dc.subject.courseIDENG-3992en_US
dc.subjectVDP::Humaniora: 000::Litteraturvitenskapelige fag: 040::Engelsk litteratur: 043en_US
dc.subjectVDP::Humanities: 000::Literary disciplines: 040::English literature: 043en_US
dc.subjectFeminismen_US
dc.subjectPoststructuralismen_US
dc.subjectAngela Carteren_US
dc.subjectMargaret Atwooden_US
dc.subjectFairy-tale studiesen_US
dc.subjectFan fictionen_US
dc.subjectCharles Baudelaireen_US
dc.subjectThe Bloody Chamberen_US
dc.subjectGood Bonesen_US
dc.subjectGrimm Brothersen_US
dc.subjectCharles Perraulten_US
dc.subjectLeprince de Beaumonten_US
dc.title"But you can't get me out of the story". Feminist Revision of Fairy Tales in Short Stories by Margaret Atwood and Angela Carteren_US
dc.typeMaster thesisen_US
dc.typeMastergradsoppgaveen_US


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