Recent additions

  • Kant on Love and Law - Including a Glance at St. Paul 

    Himmelmann, Beatrix (Chapter; Bokkapittel, 2021-11-08)
    In his letter to the Romans, as well as in his letter to the Galatians, St. Paul presents us with an insightful account of antinomianism, that is, a critique of the law. It poses a very interesting challenge to Kant’s law conception of ethics. In fact, the Paulinian caveat seems to anticipate some of the criticism that Kant’s confidence in the moral law has encountered. To this day, Friedrich ...
  • Refugees and minorities: some conceptual and normative issues 

    Lippert-Rasmussen, Kasper; Lægaard, Sune (Journal article; Tidsskriftartikkel; Peer reviewed, 2020-03-29)
    In many contexts, states have a duty to take special measures to protect minorities. Does this duty include prioritizing minority over majority refugees? To answer this question, we first show that a vulnerabilityfocused notion of ‘minorities’ is preferable to a numerical one. Given the vulnerability-focused notion, there is a presumption in favour of prioritizing minority over majority refugees. ...
  • Fitch's paradox and truthmaking: Why Jago's argument remains ineffective 

    Nyseth, Fredrik (Journal article; Tidsskriftartikkel; Peer reviewed, 2022-05-02)
    Recently, there have been several attempts to use the kind of reasoning found in Fitch’s knowability paradox to argue for rather sweeping metaphysical claims: Jago (2020) uses such reasoning to argue that every truth has a truthmaker, and Loss (2021) does so to argue that every fact is grounded. This strategy has been criticized by Trueman (2021), who points out that the same kind of reasoning could ...
  • Liberalism and the right to strike 

    Tanyi, Attila; McLeod, Stephen K (Journal article; Tidsskriftartikkel; Chronicle; Kronikk; Others; Andre, 2022-05-12)
    Although trade union membership in the UK went into serious decline in the decades following the Conservative election victory of 1979, recent years have seen an increase. Strikes nowadays are typically lesser in scale and duration than the big strikes of the twentieth century. The law on ballot thresholds under the Trade Union Act 2016 represents a formidable obstacle. Nevertheless, strikes remain ...
  • Safety in numbers: how social choice theory can inform avalanche risk management 

    Ebert, Philip; Morreau, Michael (Journal article; Tidsskriftartikkel; Peer reviewed, 2022-01-21)
    Avalanche studies have undergone a transition in recent years. Early research focused mainly on environmental factors. More recently, attention has turned to human factors in decision making, such as behavioural and cognitive biases. This article adds a social component to this human turn in avalanche studies. It identifies lessons for decision making by groups of skiers from the perspective of ...
  • Is the Beneficiary Pays Principle Essential in Climate Justice? 

    Heyward, Jennifer Clare (Journal article; Tidsskriftartikkel; Peer reviewed, 2021-09-09)
    The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change principle of ‘common but differentiated responsibility’ admits many interpretations. In the philosophical literature on climate justice, it has typically been cashed out in terms of the following three principles: the ability to pay principle (APP), the beneficiary pays principle (BPP), and the contribution to problem principle (CPP). Many ...
  • Special Claims from Improvement: A Comment on Armstrong 

    Heyward, Jennifer Clare; Lenzi, Dominic (Journal article; Tidsskriftartikkel; Peer reviewed, 2021-07-28)
    Chris Armstrong argues that attempts at justifying special claims over natural resources generally take one of two forms: arguments from improvement and arguments from attachment. We argue that Armstrong fails to establish that the distinction between natural resources and improved resources has no normative significance. He succeeds only in showing that ‘improvers’ (whoever they may be) are ...
  • Structural Injustice and Labour Migration – From Individual Responsibility to Collective Action 

    Egan, Magnus (Journal article; Tidsskriftartikkel; Peer reviewed, 2021-07-18)
    This paper argues that the vast inequalities in access to migration opportunities and treatment of migrants constitute a structural injustice, and that although states are clearly the most powerful agents in migration injustices, individuals also bear a personal responsibility to ameliorate these injustices. The argument builds on Young’s theory of structural injustice and critically applies it ...
  • THE “FOREIGN” VIRUS? - Justifying Norway’s Border Closure 

    Tanyi, Attila; Egan, Magnus Skytterholm (Journal article; Tidsskriftartikkel; Peer reviewed, 2021-12-20)
    In response to the COVID pandemic, the Norwegian government implemented the strictest border controls in modern Norwegian history, barring entry to most foreign nationals. The Prime Minister, Erna Solberg, justified these policies with reference to the rise of new COVID variants and the need to limit visitors to Norway as much as possible. As this approach has severe adverse effects on many people, ...
  • Chris Armstrong on Global Equality and Special Claims to Resources 

    Angell, Kim (Journal article; Tidsskriftartikkel; Peer reviewed, 2021-07-29)
    In ‘Justice and Natural Resources,’ Chris Armstrong offers a rich and sophisticated egalitarian theory of resource justice, according to which the benefits and burdens flowing from natural (and non-natural) resources are ideally distributed with a view to equalize people’s access to wellbeing, unless there are compelling reasons that justify departures from that egalitarian default. Armstrong discusses ...
  • Heteronomi som forutsetning for autonomi 

    Nilsen, Fredrik (Journal article; Tidsskriftartikkel; Peer reviewed, 2021-06-15)
    In his major works in ethics, Immanuel Kant (1724—1804) does not pay much attention to the question how humans become moral. The main tasks for Kant in these works are to establish the moral law and discuss its application. However, in his minor works in ethics and pedagogy he draws our attention to the question mentioned and claims that humans first become moral when they get 16 years old. Before ...
  • Entrapment, Temptation, and Virtue Testing 

    Tanyi, Attila; McLeod, Stephen K; Hill, Daniel J. (Journal article; Tidsskriftartikkel; Preprint; Manuskript, 2021)
    We address the ethics of scenarios in which one party (the ‘agent’) entraps, intentionally tempts, or intentionally tests the virtue of another (the ‘target’). We classify, in a new manner, three distinct types of acts that are of concern, namely acts of entrapment, of (mere) intentional temptation and of (mere) virtue testing. Our classification is, for each kind of scenario, of itself neutral ...
  • How many women judges are enough on international courts? 

    Føllesdal, Andreas (Journal article; Tidsskriftartikkel; Peer reviewed, 2021-02-21)
    The African Court of Human and Peoples’ Rights (ACtHPR) made history on August 27, 2018. The majority of its judges were female—six of 11, and the first among international courts and tribunals (ICs) to secure sex parity—that is, numerical equality.1 This achievement is even more remarkable given that only 23% of the judges and arbitrators of the ICs are women.2 The milestone also prompts us ...
  • The basic liberties: An essay on analytical specification 

    McLeod, Stephen K; Tanyi, Attila (Journal article; Tidsskriftartikkel; Preprint; Manuskript, 2021)
    We characterize, more precisely than before, what Rawls calls the “analytical” method of drawing up a list of basic liberties. This method employs one or more general conditions that, under any just social order whatever, putative entitlements must meet for them to be among the basic liberties encompassed, within some just social order, by Rawls’s first principle of justice (i.e., the liberty ...
  • Indigenous citizenship, shared fate, and non-ideal circumstances 

    Vitikainen, Annamari (Journal article; Tidsskriftartikkel; Peer reviewed, 2020-10-27)
    This paper discusses the notion of ‘citizenship as shared fate’ as a potentially inclusive and real-world responsive way of understanding Indigenous citizenship in a non-ideal world. The paper draws on Melissa Williams’ work on ‘citizenship as shared fate,’ and assesses some of the benefits and drawbacks of using this notion to understand citizenship in Indigenous and modern state contexts. In ...
  • Entrapment 

    Hill, Daniel J.; McLeod, Stephen K.; Tanyi, Attila (Preprint; Manuskript, 2021-06-29)
    We discuss how the law and scholars have approached three questions. First, what acts count as acts of entrapment? Secondly, is entrapment a permissible method of law-enforcement and, if so, in what circumstances? Thirdly, what must criminal courts do, in response to the finding that an offence was brought about by an act of entrapment, in order to deliver justice? While noting the contrary tendency, ...
  • Sofie av Hannover og Sinn-Kropp-Problemet 

    Nilsen, Fredrik (Journal article; Tidsskriftartikkel; Peer reviewed, 2021-03-18)
    I sin korrespondanse med Gottfried Wilhelm von Leibniz stiller den tysk-engelske filosofen Sofie, kurfyrstinne av Hannover, spørsmål ved noen av de mest sentrale elementene i Leibniz sin filosofi. Dette gjelder monadebegrepet og teorien om preetablert harmoni generelt, samt hans løsning på sinn-kropp-problemet spesielt. Ifølge Leibniz er sinn og kropp to atskilte og uavhengige monader som virker ...
  • Territory, self-determination, and climate change: Reflections on Anna Stilz’s Territorial Sovereignty: A Philosophical Exploration 

    Heyward, Jennifer Clare (Journal article; Tidsskriftartikkel; Peer reviewed, 2020-10-02)
    The assertion of territorial claims is one of the longest standing political issues in the world and, as the number of ongoing disputes shows, has lost none of its significance in contemporary times. Humans long for a place they can call “theirs”: whether that involves an individual being able to have a “room of one’s own” (Woolf, 1929) within a household, or being able to control the behavior of ...
  • Introducing Normativity in African International Politics 

    Abumere, Frank (Journal article; Tidsskriftartikkel; Peer reviewed, 2020-07-21)
    With fifty-four states, Africa represents a microcosm of the Westphalian world. In conjunction with the Westphalian fragmentation of the continent, other fragmentations have compounded the intractable problem of ‘othering’ on the continent. The fragmentations sum up an African condition in the twenty-first century because they simultaneously represent the ‘divisions’ based on which Africans are ...
  • The problem with the individualist approach to the principle of the immunity of non-combatants 

    Abumere, Frank (Journal article; Tidsskriftartikkel; Peer reviewed, 2020-09-25)
    The world is littered with wars in which innocent individual human beings, helpless groups of persons and harmless institutions are casualties because they are directly or indirectly targeted and attacked. The nature or composition of such casualties calls for a revision of, or at least leads one to question, the dominant approach to the principle of non-combatant immunity. In the just war theory, ...

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