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dc.contributor.authorArmbrecht, John
dc.contributor.authorSkallerud, Kåre
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-10T12:10:38Z
dc.date.available2019-05-10T12:10:38Z
dc.date.embargoEndDate2021-03-22
dc.date.issued2019-03-22
dc.description.abstractAquaculture (i.e., farming of aquatic organisms, including fish, molluscs, crustaceans, and aquatic plants) is playing an increasingly important role in the global food supply. The contribution of aquaculture to total fish production has risen steadily, reaching 44% in 2014 (Moffitt and Cajas-Cano, 2014). The future growth of aquaculture is expected to help accomplish the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by reducing environmental consequences associated with livestock while simultaneously increasing food security and promoting the nutritional benefits of marine food products (Thilsted et al., 2016). An increase in aquaculture is, however, dependent on its expansion to new sites outside the traditional aquaculture areas. Sweden, especially its southwest region, is one potential new area for mariculture development. The Swedish government has adopted a national strategy to develop the mariculture industry to become a profitable and sustainable industry with ethical production standards.1 While Swedish aquaculture produces moderate quantities today, its year-on-year growth target between the present and 2020 is an average increase of 8% annually (corresponding to a 71% increase from 2013 to 2020). This goal corresponds to an annual production in 2020 of fish for consumption and crayfish and mussels of approximately 23,000 tonnes as well as a total annual production of 25,000 tonnes of fish and crustaceans.<p> <p>While the biological and geographical conditions in the area seem promising, Bailey et al. (1996) showed that mariculture development is influenced not only by natural and physical conditions but also by conditions that are inherently economic and social in nature. Research has proven that there may be positive effects (Ceballos et al., 2018; Toufique and Belton, 2014) or no impact (Nguyen et al., 2016) on the economy. Little research, however, has examined the perceived contribution in social and economic terms. The increasing importance of mariculture as an industry and its development in coastal areas outside traditional mariculture areas (Oyinlola et al., 2018) has prompted a need to integrate an understanding of the social and economic conditions as a prerequisite for sustainable development (Barrington et al., 2010; Bucklin and Howell, 1998). Consideration of the local population within communities is a fundamental precept of new mariculture development to understand the views and perspectives of the local residents and to ensure local acceptance (Memery and Birch, 2016; Salgado et al., 2015). Despite the increased attention paid to mariculture development, research on social conditions is limited (Mazur and Curtis, 2008; Nash, 2004), and no studies have included local residents' perspectives on social and economic conditions. The expansion of mariculture of most species requires access and use of coastal areas. This requirement is also anticipated for mariculture development in the archipelago in the southwest of Sweden, a coastal region suitable for mariculture development. Because the development initiatives may potentially affect archipelago communities, local residents and second-home owners, who have invested in their properties and proximity to the sea as valuable assets, will be affected. Their attitudes and reaction towards mariculture will therefore be important in the future development. However, researchers are still struggling to answer the most basic question: How will local residents react to new mariculture development in their region? The aim of the present study is to investigate the attitudes and resistance intention of residents in southwest Sweden regarding the development of new mariculture. Understanding the perceived social consequences will assist policy makers, mariculturists, mariculture advocates and other professionals seeking to further develop a sustainable mariculture industry.<p>en_US
dc.descriptionAccepted manuscript version, licensed <a href=http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/> CC BY-NC-ND 4.0. </a> Published version available at <a href=https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2019.03.017>https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2019.03.017. </a>en_US
dc.identifier.citationArmbrecht, J. & Skallerud, K. (2019). Attitudes and intentional reactions towards mariculture development - local residents' perspective. <i>Ocean and Coastal Management, 174</i>, 56-62. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2019.03.017en_US
dc.identifier.cristinIDFRIDAID 1690299
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2019.03.017
dc.identifier.issn0964-5691
dc.identifier.issn1873-524X
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10037/15281
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.relation.journalOcean and Coastal Management
dc.rights.accessRightsembargoedAccessen_US
dc.subjectVDP::Social science: 200en_US
dc.subjectVDP::Samfunnsvitenskap: 200en_US
dc.titleAttitudes and intentional reactions towards mariculture development - local residents' perspectiveen_US
dc.typeJournal articleen_US
dc.typeTidsskriftartikkelen_US
dc.typePeer revieweden_US


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